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Low-Fat Avocados Are a Thing Now, But Don't Get Too Excited

Low-Fat Avocados Are a Thing Now, But Don't Get Too Excited


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The best part about avocados is the healthy fat

Dreamstime

Low-fat avocado toast, anyone?

One Spanish company seems to have missed the point of avocados. They’ve produced a low-fat version of the healthy-fat staple, calling it an “Avocado Light.”

If we’ve learned anything from “light” yogurts, it’s that these diet foods are to be avoided — but perhaps the light avocado will be different.

The newly engineered crop comes with 30 percent less fat than its plump relatives, evidently tasting similar but boasting the texture of a “soft and pleasant pulp” according to its developers.

The fruit ripens faster, so it can be consumed without sitting on the counter for three plus days, yet oxidizes more slowly, meaning that once you slice it open it doesn’t immediately turn that nasty shade of brown. They’ve accomplished this farming feat by manipulating temperature and soil conditions for their crop.

They plan to launch the product in Madrid at a trade fair, where they expect it will be a hit.

“Its arrival in Spain could mark the second big jump in the development of the avocado the market,” said the company’s marketing director Ramón Rey.

The fruits, however, have become so popular in large part because of their fat content. One avocado contains anywhere from 20 to 30 grams of healthy fats, which have been linked to a decrease in heart disease, cholesterol, and even cancer. By taking out the fat, aren’t these Spaniards also taking out the appeal?

We’ll have to wait and see how Spain reacts to this recent innovation. Perhaps they’ll just use it as an excuse to eat even more of their new favorite fruit. Avocado consumption has more than doubled in Spain from 2012 to 2016 — arguably a positive change, since there are over 20 health reasons you should be eating them every day.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.


Low-Fat Diet: Why Fat-Free Isn't Trouble-Free

If your goal is to keep cholesterol levels down or lose weight, "fat-free" isn't a magic bullet.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

The Trouble With Fat-Free

Sometimes "fat-free" is also, well, taste-free. And to make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. That can add calories.

Plus, if the foods aren't that appealing, they may be less satisfying, so you may eat too much of them.



Comments:

  1. Faugrel

    Well, little by little.

  2. Isdemus

    I read, like subscribe to a blog. Question: How?

  3. Samuktilar

    The shame!

  4. Kamau

    I think he is wrong. I'm sure. Write to me in PM, speak.

  5. Marlyssa

    We are waiting for the continuation. Of course, rather exaggerated, however, personal experience shows something close to what is described.



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